© 2018 Judge Collection. 

347 Abercorn St. Savannah, Ga 31401

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A Private Collection With A Public Focus

 

The Judge Realty art collection represents the passion Lori Judge and husband Lou Thomann share for local and regional art works and their willingness to share this love with the public.

The collection, on display at the Judge Realty office in Savannah’s Historic District, has been built around the themes of the environment, energy, and the economy. The 12' office ceilings and generously proportioned front windows provide the optimum opportunity for public viewing and enjoyment both inside and outside of the building; fulfilling the mission of public access to the private collection.

The desire to support local art and afford public accessibility is also achieved through an annual arts project at the Judge office location. Past projects have utilized the exterior of the Judge Realty office building as a blank canvas for local artists to share their creativity with the public. Artist Jamie Bourgeois created a living moss mural titled "Mossterpiece," Katherine Sandoz’s “Flower Power” used recycled plastic bags re- purposed as flowers to surround  an exterior door frame, and Will Penny’s digital technology display "Intersection" was projected onto the facade to create a nighttime illumination of shapes and patterns; all these past displays have helped to expand the definition of public art to include more than traditional monuments and sculptures.

Judge Realty hopes to redefine how creativity and art can be incorporated into the lives of the local community by making art accessible in nontraditional as well as traditional ways.

As the Judge Realty Art Collection grows and no longer can be displayed at the Judge Realty office, a more permanent location will be found.

"To be an artist is not a matter of making paintings or objects at all. What we are really dealing with is our state of consciousness and the shape of our perceptions."

Robert Irwin